Water Storage and Irrigation System

A small deck and arbour disguises the concrete cistern which collects our spring water, and provides a beautiful space from which to enjoy the pond. The hand pump allows us to access water if the power is out.

Water is a precious resource on the Southern Gulf Islands… and figuring out how to manage what we have when we have it is integral for everyone.  The water source for our three acres of land is supplied by a spring, which has been a registered water source since the 1950’s.  It comes out underground from fissures through the bedrock slope that we have built our house on, and it is beleived that the main supply is filled by rain water running off of George Hill, which rises to the north of our property.  While the land had been only mildly developed, the source of the spring was dug and pooled into a gravel bed and directed to a small concrete cistern.  Previous owners added a small water pump and plastic 300 gallon tank for their domestic use, which serviced the trailer that we became residents of when we purchased the land.

2009- pond dug and water cistern going in

The spring flows all year, but has seasonal fluctuations of flow which correspond quite directly to local rain fall.  It slows to a trickle during the dry season, and fills up again within a few weeks of our first fall rains.  So we have a huge abundance of water in the winter, but we still have to be careful not to overtax the storage capacity in the summer.  With more gardens being created, and more water facilities in the house up and running, we needed to amend our water system to include more water storage.

We added a 1200 gallon buried concrete cistern at the time that we dug the pond, in 2009.  Our field is solid clay, and so was horrifically wet all winter and the pond helped to redirect the incoming winter moisture.  The concrete cistern overflows into the pond, which overflows towards the garden.  However, the water level of the pond drops below the outfall in June, and so the spilling waterway dries up in the season when we could use it the most.  As the next 6 years went along, we watered the garden by hand (which got to be a bigger and bigger job) and experienced  a few summers of extended hot dry conditions, which proved difficult for the spring. Last April we addressed this by adding 2 plastic above ground tanks, each holding 2,000 gallons, for the prupose of irrigation.  The summer following was another long and dry season, but we had awesome results with keeping plants well watered through drip lines and mulch, using the water we set aside from the spring.  We had to refill them partly in August, setting the refill flow at a slow trickle overnight.  By the time the rains returned in october, our season of growing was less intense and we could turn off the irrigation.

 

Here is a water map of our system as it is functioning at this time.

  1. Underground spring collects into gravel bed and perforated pipe, then gravity feeds to fill the cistern.
  2. Buried concrete cistern holds 1200 gallons, and overflows into the pond.
  3. Water pump in the shop draws water up to the house for our domestic supply.
  4. Water goes through a UV filter.
  5. Outside house tap is turned on to fill the two above ground cisterns using the filtered spring water. (2000 gallons each)

The water is then fed by gravity into the irrigation lines.  A 1″ hose heads to the orchard, where it is split into a 3/4″ line that continues around the pond, and into a 1/2″ line that runs through the orchard.  Drip hoses with either 6″or 12″ spaced drip holes irrigate the rows of cordon espalier fruit trees, and into the various flower, herb, and berry beds.  The veggie garden system is similar, with various drip lines coming off the 1/2″ line.  We dug the 3/4″ line shallowly into the ground around the pond as well as burying the 1/2″ line in places where it crossed paths to avoid damage from stepping on it or tripping.  Two timers are attached to the lines leading into the orchard and leading into the veggie garden, since each area has differing water needs, and shut off valves are placed at the major forks to allow us to manually open or close each section.

The drip system was fairly straight forwards to install after a lesson from islander John Eckfeldt who supplied us with the system.  It is fairly flexible and configurations are easy to adapt for year to year changes.  It works well with a gravity feed, although it is usually affixed to a pressurized system.  Our large tanks are uphill from the gardens by a small degree, so we did some drip tests to see if the volume of water coming from one drip hole was the same as the product indicated, as well as testing out a length of drip line to see if the drip rate was the same after 20 feet.  The timers we bought are also intended to work with less pressure such as gravity provides.

 

 

 

First Pear Crop

We have six pear trees of three varieties in our cordon orchard that was planted in 2014.  This was the first year that we got pears from these trees- a small number of very large pears of each kind.  In my attempt to chronical the annual progress of the orchard, here is a brief description of the pear varieties we planted.

conference pearConference pear- Conference is by far the most widely grown pear in north-west Europe. The variety was found in 1884 as an open pollinated seedling, from a Leon Leclerc de Laval, and cultivated by Thomas Rivers, from Sawbridgeworth in England. It was named ‘Conference’ in 1895 after the ‘British National Pear Conference’ where it was first exhibited. Not long after, this variety occupied a major position within European pear cultivation, due not only to its good flavour characteristics but also to its excellent storage properties. During the last few decades the quality of Conference has been further improved following changes to cultivation techniques, making it the highest in pear cultivation in the Netherlands and Belgium.  Ready for harvest mid september, the conference is a medium sized pear with an elongated bottle, and is suitable for fresh-cut processing.  The skin is thick greenish-brown, becoming pale yellow when ripe, with a moderate amount of russet. The flesh is white, but turns pale yellow when the pear is ripe.  The texture is very fine and soft, and the flavour is sweet.

From European heritage, to local Pacific Westcoast modern varieties…

orcas pearOrcas Pear- Discovered on Orcas Island, Washington, and introduced in 1986, this excellent, disease-resistant variety produces good crops of very large and attractive, carmine blushed, yellow pears with smooth, sweet, buttery flesh. Excellent for fresh eating, canning and drying, Orcas Pear is very reliable and productive and ripens in early to mid-September. These beautiful and tasty Pears can weigh of 1 lb. each!  The Orcas is included in the gardens of the Western Washington Fruit Research Foundation, which works to advance fruit horticultural programs for the unique Western Washington maritime climate through advocacy, research, education, and demonstration for the benefit of the general public and the small farmer.

rescue pearRescue Pear- This very large, attractive, yellow fruit with reddish-orange blush is sweet, juicy and flavorful, and great for fresh eating and drying. Well adapted to our Pacific Northwest growing conditions, Rescue is a vigorous, productive, and reliable variety.  The rescue pear was found by Knox Nomura, a nursery grower near Buckley, WA. He had seen the pear at fruit shows but the exhibitor never allowed anyone to take cuttings from his tree during his lifetime, and after his death the tree was scheduled for removal to expand an adjacent cemetery. Knox Nomura “rescued” scionwood from this original tree, and sent trees to Mount Vernon in 1975 for testing. Introduced in 1987.  Ripens early september.

We deeply enjoyed tasting these home grown pears and getting to know their unique qualities.  I look forwards to the maturing of these young trees and the productivity that will flourish as I learn the best pruning techniques for the cordon espalier system that they have been established on.

 

Expanding the Orchard

chojuro asian pear

Last fall we ordered 5 more fruit trees from Bob Duncan at Fruit Trees and More, our favourite fruit tree supplier.  This time we got 3 plums and two asian pears, all on a dwarf stock.  Bob did some initial pruning when we went to pick up the trees, and showed me how to bend out the remaining branches to encourage tiers of branches spread in a circle around the main leader.  I have tied down the branches while they are still bendable to encourage an open shape.  I planted the trees right away with a sprinkling of bone meal and organic fertilizer, watered them in well and later applied a thick layer of leaf mulch.  Here are the details of the varieties:

Seneca plum– large purple fruit, resembling Italian variety.  Ripens early september, with high quality eating plums also good for canning and drying.

Yellow Egg plum– large, oval yellow fruit with yellow flesh.  Ripens mid september, soft and sweet for eating and canning.

Stanley plum-Ripens mid september, European plum medium to large, excellent for eating fresh, cooking, or canning.

Nijisseki asian pear– ripens late august, medium round, greenish yellow skinned, firm and crisp, excellent eating quality.

Chojuro asian pear– ripens mid august, medium round, brown skinned, mildly sweet, firm and crisp.

asian pear and native berries

asian pear and native berries

The new area is to the west of the orchard that we put in two years ago, and is slightly shadier and wetter than the rest of the open space.  However, this was the only place we could expand the fencing due to our continued plans to have excavators and piles of building materials in the next few years.  I dug trenches for drainage to keep the areas where the bare root fruit trees were to be planted as well drained as possible.  I have been wanting to establish areas of berries, like blueberries, strawberries and raspberries, but I think this new area is too dark and wet.  I discovered that there are lots of native berries that produce abundantly, so I added a few plants each of evergreen huckleberry (growing 5-6 feet tall), lingonberry (2 feet tall), and wintergreen (ground cover).

wintergreen

wintergreen

Hummingbirds love the small, pink-white flowers like fairy bells of the evergreen huckleberry (Vaccinium ovatum). Late in the summer, black-purple fruits form. Native only to the Pacific Coast (USDA 6-9), it likes acidic soil and can tolerate salt spray and strong winds.  The delicious fruit for pies, jam and unique toppings is an added bonus. In forested areas it can reach 15’ and spreads to form beautiful, dense stands. The glossy, dark green leaves are small and the new shoots are a bronzy red. In full sun, it dwarfs to 3-5,’ and the mature foliage often turns reddish purple.

lingonberry

lingonberry

Vaccinium vitis-idaea (lingonberry) is a short evergreen shrub in the heath family that bears edible fruit, native to boreal forest and Arctic tundra throughout the Northern Hemisphere from Eurasia to North America.  These plants thrive in moist, acidic soils from Massachusetts to Alaska, producing an abundance of healthful, cranberry-like fruits.

Wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbent) is a ground cover that produces the classically refreshing flavour of crisp mint.  The small red berries can be mealy, but are rich in vitamin c.  It is cold hardy and keeps it’s glossy leaves all winter, producing white or pink-tinged bell-like flowers.

new orchard

drainage trenches running between planting areas

Already established in the same area is a black elderberry (sambucus nigra) and three chokecherries that I planted in the margins of the original orchard area.  They are all now nice and tall and bushy, and producing lots of bunches of berries.  Last fall I made a jar of elderberry syrup.  We also have a small native red huckleberry, so I hope to see this corner of the garden flourish with series of all types that we, as well as the birds, can enjoy! dwarf fruit trees

 

 

Discovery Apples!

Clockwise: Tydeman's Late Orange, Bramley's Seedling, Lord Lambourne, Rubinette

Clockwise: Tydeman’s Late Orange, Bramley’s Seedling, Lord Lambourne, Rubinette

Our orchard, now in it’s second year, (and first year of fruiting) has produced 8 varieties of apples out of the 17 types that we planted.  Most of the trees had flowers, and it is my guess that the intensely early heat and dryness that we experienced last spring might have contributed to incomplete pollination of many of the trees, or the flowers prematurely falling off.  We have the trees on an irrigation system to help establish the trees in their early years, but it was indeed a challenging season for water and heat.

slicing up Bramley's Seedling

slicing up Bramley’s Seedling

We had one early, transparent variety, a Lodi, drop it’s apples before we realized what type it was!  I spent some time after that looking up the varieties that we planted so we knew generally when to pick the few apples without wasting them.  (The varieties were chosen by Bob Duncan of Fruits Trees and More, and are a diverse collection of heritage apples ripening at different times and having different properties.  They are all a mystery to us and so we are slowly learning by experience!)

Here is what we tasted this year:

Lodi- early transparent from 1924, USA.  Good fresh eating (if harvested at the right time!)  We didn’t get a picture but it looked like a transparent- greeny yellow and soft.

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Lord Lambourne

Lord Lambourne- produced the most this year, with a harvest of 9 apples between 2 trees!  A delicious, juicy, crunchy, flavourful apple that we all loved. From 1923 in England.  Mid season.

Rubinette

Rubinette

Rubinette- only 2 apples, fruity and a beautiful red blush over a yellow background.  Almost glowing in colour.  1966, Switzerland- not entirely a heritage.  Mid season.

Bramley's Seedling

Bramley’s Seedling

Bramley’s Seedling- definitely a late season as the 2 huge apples we got were still tart and a bit hard.  However, the description we found said tart, excellent baking apple that keeps 4 months.  1809, England, gives it official heritage status in my mind.

snow

snow

Snow- We got 8 of these little gems between the 2 trees.  They are bright red and beautifully round.  Late season, so we haven’t picked them, but my son ate one and said it was delicious.  Trees Of Antiquity says this:  Snow Fameuse is one of the oldest and most desirable dessert apples, a parent of the aromatic McIntosh. It was found in almost every French settlement, in the late 1700’s, as the Snow apple was planted 1,000 miles in every direction of Canada and the lower states. Flesh is tender, spicy, distinctive in flavor, and snow white in color with occasional crimson stains near the skin. Snow apple is very hardy, heavy bearing tree that is excellent for home orchards. Snow Fameuse is delicious fresh off the tree, in cider, or in culinary creations. One of very few apples that often reproduce true to variety when established from seed.

Tydeman's Late Orange

Tydeman’s Late Orange

Tydeman’s Late Orange- As named, another late variety, but we only had one so we went ahead and tried it.  From England, 1949, good fresh eating and can store for 5-6 months.

Poppy's Wonder

Poppy’s Wonder

Poppies’ Wonder- I couldn’t find much about this variety, and I think this is why- “In the 1990’s, there have even been some great recent chance seedlings such as Poppy’s Wonder, created when a Cox seed was thrown in a compost pile in Victoria, BC and this fabulous apple tree resulted.” Harry Burton, on why we don’t need a GE apple.I think it is a late season apple, very red and round and sweet.

spitzenburg

spitzenburg

Spitzenburg- This single apple we harvested was fantastic.  Another heritage- Spitzenburg apple was discovered in the late 1700s by an early Dutch settler of that name. It was found at the settlement of Esopus, on the Hudson River, in Ulster County, New York. Much attention was bestowed upon Spitzenburg apple when Thomas Jefferson ordered a dozen trees for his orchard in Monticello. Unexcelled in flavor or quality, the fruit is great off the tree, but flavor radically improves in storage. Medium apple with crisp, yellow skin covered with inconspicuous red stripes and russet freckles. Flesh is tinged yellow, firm, aromatic, and complex in flavor; a perfect balance between sharp and sweet.  Late season.

rubinetteSo much to learn and discover!  We look forwards to getting to know the rest of the apples as they begin to produce in the coming years, along with the apricot, nectarine, peach, pears, and quince- and the  plums and asian pears that we have ordered for planting in march.

 

 

Discovery Orchard Progress

Discovery orchardLast March, we planted a 40 tree cordon orchard on our property, which I wrote about in Discovery Orchard.  There were things left unfinished after the initial planting of the young trees as we moved into a busy spring and summer.  We have finally completed the support system and protective roof structure in time for winter, as well as learning a few things about the pruning of these fruit trees.  Unfortunately, a persistent deer got into the orchard one night and stripped all the leaves off every tree, which altered the pruning techniques we learned to some degree.  All the trees came back just fine from this ravage, however, leafing out once again and putting on some new growth along the top leader.

post saddlesColin split all the posts we needed from his salvaged cedar collection, a side benefit of his business, Thujawoodart.  They are mounted on saddles that were concreted in place when the rows were dug, a total of four posts in each of the four rows.  We used airline cable (1/4 inch stranded stainless cable) tensioned at one end with turnbuckles, three to a row placed at 2, 4, and 6 foot heights.

At each tree, I attached a long piece of bamboo with zip ties to the cables, at a 45 degree angle mirroring the angle that we planted the trees.  Then the main stem of each tree was gently tied to the bamboo with stretchable plastic ties.  We pulled off all the flowers (after they were finished- I had a hard time pulling them off when they were still so beautiful!) to encourage the trees to put more energy into establishing their root systems.  The trees sent out side branches during the summer, and when it came time to prune them in August, Colin met with Bob Duncan at Fruit Trees and More to watch how he prunes his cordon fruit trees.  That’s when the deer got in, but we did what we could anyways, which was cutting back each side branch after the third cluster of leaves.  The leader was tied along the bamboo as it grew.

We also added a watering system to help establish the trees in their first few years.  We have a rain barrel sitting on a platform 6 feet high, using gravity to send water as needed to each row using drip tape.  The rain barrel is outfitted with a float at the top, which triggers automatic refilling as needed from our spring.  It has been hard to keep the rows free of weeds- it seems that the well watered soil is hard to resist for many of the field plants that were growing there before.  I have decided to let the clover take over, which seems to do a good job of keeping out the buttercup, thistles, blackberries, and dandelions  My thought is to perhaps cut it down or mulch over it again in late fall and allow it to decompose over the winter.

Our next challenge was constructing the roof over the rows, something which Bob suggested.  He has been growing fruit trees for more than 30 years, and has come to realize that our naturally damp climate makes in difficult to avoid canker and scab and a variety of other diseases after a period of time.  He was in the process of covering all his apple trees when we purchased our trees from him last spring.  It is not common to put a shelter over apple trees, but Bob considered it to be a major organic solution and something that is easier to install right from the beginning.  Covering the trees meant that we could also add some water sensitive varieties like apricots, nectarines, and peaches to our orchard.  sunflowersColin tracked down long metal pipes that are used for drilling wells, and with the skills of a local welder, he constructed a frame that mounts to the top of the posts, one frame covering two rows, with a minimal overhang.  We stretched greenhouse plastic as best we could across each frame, using pvc piping cut into quarters to clamp the plastic to the metal frame and using  self tapping metal screws to hold it all in place.  We aren’t sure if the plastic will develop any sags with heavy water collection, although Colin did make sure that each roof had a slope for run off.

So long as the deer stay out, we should be looking to begin harvesting next year, and with practiced pruning and training our trees should be in full production in 4-5 years.  To read more about the planting and varieties of the trees, please read my previous posting Discovery Orchard.

Snorkeling the Gulf Islands

snorkeling in the gulf islandsOne of the only drawbacks that I have experienced from living in the Gulf Islands is that the water temperature remains, all year round, at a chilly 7 degrees celsius, making it a rather uncomfortable experience for swimming, even on the hottest day of the summer.  Other beaches around Vancouver Island and small islands further north enjoy warm summer swimming in areas of wide sandy beaches, but here, we have lots of rocks and cliffs that dive down deep into fast moving currents.  Apparently, this boasts incredibly well for diving, providing some of the most life abundant waters thriving in the refrigerator that is our local ocean.  It is a frustrating thing to live so close to the ocean and never have the chance to really get in it.  Colin and I have spent many years surfing the West Coast of Vancouver Island, so we have outfitted ourselves with cold water wetsuits for years, but it has only been recently that I realized the simple and beautiful activity of snorkeling around the many bays, inlets, islets, and cliff edges that we are surrounded with.

Pender Penguins snorkeling in January

Pender Penguins snorkeling in January

In January, I put out a call to a few friends, and we started meeting at a local bay to test out wetsuits and snorkel gear, new and old, to see what we had that works and what we need to explore further in comfort and safety.  My 5mm suit with hood, and warm boots and gloves worked quite well with a new snorkel set.  However, while searching for a suit for my daughter, who now is determined to join us in the water, I found a new zipperless Patagonia suit made with 25% merino wool on sale for half price, so I have upgraded from my 15 year old suit.  I figure this will last me the rest of my water-immersed life!5mm wetsuit

We have seen many beautiful things- so many different types of sea stars, anemones, a buffet of seaweeds, crabs, chitons, sea cucumbers, sea urchins, and unidentified splendor of all types.  A local diver, Derek Holzapfel, has created a marine species photo database on his website that I have often referred to find out about what I am seeing and what there is to look for.  It is a big learning curve from knowing nothing of what lives below the low tide line, to seeing what thrives by staying deeply submerged.  Getting to swim through swaying bull kelp in sunlit waters has been a dreamy highlight, as well as skimming over shallow rocks covered in feathering barnacles, floating out over a steep drop off of turquoise greenness, then turning to face a wall of life reaching out into the passing fresh currents.

cliffs and kelp beds

cliffs and kelp beds

Every swim is different, even when we visit the same place, and amazing things can be huge or tiny, like the discovery of the giant pink star, (almost 2 feet across!) and sea cucumbers as long as my arm, or the tiny 4cm long white nudibranch tucked in amongst the seaweed jungle.  The visibility has changed as we move into spring, filling the clear winter waters with a “snow” of floating stuff.  Our last swim was down at Drummond Bay, on South Pender, and we had the use of a GoPro camera to swim with.  Joanne, fellow Pender Penguin, has edited the footage into a beautiful video… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VctRs2hHdTg

kids exploringOur snorkel excursions have also created a wonderful afternoon or morning of beach time for the rest of our families and friends who are not in the water.  Our kids spend the time doing what they do best at the beach- exploring.  They often follow us along the shore.  We have taken kayaks with us so they can take turns paddling with other adults.  We have often had a warming beach fire, and food and tea to enjoy.  Coming out from the cold water and the underwater world seems to leave me in another state of being- slower and floaty, present and grateful, calm and joyful, out of body and entirely in body.  It is difficult to finally declare the chill to be great enough to leave the water, but there is also a deep sense of returning to land as being a place of home.  A re-start button gets pressed in my brain while I play and float and breath in the cold water, feeling the gentle push and pull of waves, and the responding push and pull of my body with that of the seaweeds- a floating meditation.

what lives beneath that glassy surface?

what lives beneath that glassy surface?

Discovery Orchard

an orchard visitorLast fall, Colin and I decided to get going with planting an orchard of fruit trees.  Drainage ditches had been put in around our field the previous spring, transforming our sodden and squelchy ground into a walkable and plantable area.  Our ideas of October seemed well in advance of March, so we approached a local fruit growing expert, Bob Duncan, and asked for his suggestions for the varieties of apples to make up a cordon espalier orchard of about 40 trees.  We were interested in early, mid, and late season apples, with cross pollination dates and a variety of uses for the fruit, as well as a handful of pear varieties.  Bob has been growing fruit for 30 years on the Saanich Peninsula, and now has over 300 types of fruit on his property of less than 1 acre.  He specializes in dwarf apple trees, (over 200 heritage varieties of unusual and hard to find varieties), but also has over 80 varieties of pears, plums, peaches, nectarines, apricots, cherries, figs, grapes, kiwi, quince and medlar, over 30 varieties of citrus, and hardy subtropicals such as pomegranates, persimmons, loquats, feijoa, jujubes, and olives.  We know where to go when we are looking to expand our fruit harvest!

trees coming outBob put together a list for us and said we could pick them up in four months.  By mid February, Colin eyed up a bunch of trees on the perimeter of the orchard space and decided that they would need to come out first- small and unhealthy cedar trees that leach nutrients from the soil, and some fir trees sporting signs of rot.  A week later and the open field was littered with scrambling heaps of green branches, tops of trees, and a variety of thick and rotten trunks.  It was then that we got an email announcing the imminent pick-up dates for our trees, some of which were bare root and would need to be planted right away.

fencing the clearingWe spent the next two days clearing.  Our decision not to burn anything except in a fireplace left us separating all the debris into piles- the greenery and thin branches for the chipper, the thick branches to be cut up with the chop saw for firewood, and the trunks chopped into rounds for more firewood.  Colin picked up the trees, as well as metal fence posts, a roll of wire fencing, bonemeal, dolomite lime, an organic fertilizer blend, tree tags, tree strapping, a box of 16 post saddles, three bags of concrete, and a new shovel.  Luckily, there was a trailer full with two yards of sea soil sitting just down the road waiting to be sold, so we didn’t need to do an extra trip across the water to fill up with composty soil amendment.

post holesColin laid out the four rows, 2.5 feet wide and 35 feet long each, running north south and spaced with 5 feet between them, and began to dig four post holes in each row to support the wires upon which we would train the cordon trees.  We observed that we had about one and a half feet of nice topsoil, then a solid delineation of clay.  It rained quite a bit in the time of all this digging, and it became clear that the water filtering through the topsoil was hitting the clay layer and pooling, rather abundantly, in our holes.  This didn’t bode well for any tree roots that might be planted nearby, so we resolved that we would also need a drainage ditch running across the ends of all the rows and moving any water off to the side.  The gentle slope of the orchard area will help move the water towards the ditch.

We spent another day mixing concrete, filling the post holes and setting the saddles.  We hammered in the perimeter fence posts and ran the wire fencing around the outside of the rows, leaving a measured gap for an old garden gate.  Then we dug some more.  Colin removed the soil from the rows, a foot deep and two feet wide.  I amended the soil in wheelbarrow sized batches with sea soil, one cup of bonemeal and lime, and shoveled it back into the trenches, with a lofty 4 inch berm.  planting bare root treesThe bare root trees went in first- six pears, two peaches, a nectarine and an apricot- three feet apart with the main stems set at a 45 degree angle, pointing north.  (Except for the stone fruit.  These will be grown in a fan shaped espalier at the south end of each row, filling in the space created by the first tree planted at an angle.)  Our choice to train the dwarf trees in a cordon system was based on the understanding that this system results in a high production of fruit in a small space that can be attended to very easily.

apple treesOf all the 30 apple trees, there are 17 different varieties, most of which are a complete mystery to me.  The first apple tree that I picked out of the pile was named Discovery, and as I tucked it in I wondered what a Discovery apple looks like, tastes like, and what time of the season it would be ready to harvest.  In fact, knowing nothing about any of the varieties made me realize that this whole project was going to be one of immense discovery and learning; all the different flavours and timing and uses.  We have apples called Snow and Lodi and Karmijn de Sonneville.  I am familiar with the Gravenstein and Cox, but what will a Vanderpool apple taste like?  From getting these trees planted to pruning them, training them, and generally keeping them alive for the 3-5 years until they are in full production, (and beyond) will be a whole new subject of learning for me and Colin.

We still have posts to put up, and support wire, as well as a plastic roof system that will cover all the trees 2 rows at a time,  with Bob’s recommendation.  He has been struggling for 30 years to organically avoid blight and canker, and has come to the conclusion that it is all related to the high amount of moisture that we receive on the coast.  Adding the clear roof also allows us to put in those more water tender stonefruit trees (apricot, peach, and nectarine).  Bob Duncan can be found at Fruit Trees and More.

 

 

 

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