Light Clay

The framing of the house created some interesting areas that were challenging to fill using straw bales, so we decided to do a little light clay instead.  In the upper level, the framing of the roof joins in with the framing of the floor, leaving a narrow wall space that widens out with the curve of the roofline, so filling this oddly shaped wall space with light clay was a great solution.

Light clay is a mixture of loose straw coated with clay slip and packed into a form.  The form is removed right away to allow for quick drying time, and there you go… a nice flat straw surface solidly held in place by the clay.

The process is fairly simple.  We spread loose straw on an old piece of plywood, mixed up some clay and water into a nice thick slip, poured it over the straw, and tossed it with a pitch fork.  We were looking for an end result of long straw that would stick together when squeezed, with no clay dripping or running off, but with the colour of the straw no longer golden.  Like a salad dressing… lightly coated.

 

We did the first foot of wall, adding screws or nails into the framing to give a little something for the straw to tuck into, and packing it in securely but not densely.  After we took the forms off, we let it dry out for a week, then did the rest of the wall up to the window bucks.  Our wall section widens out once it gets above the roof framing, but we didn’t want to fill the whole space at once and risk the centre staying moist for too long.  We put the forms back on higher up and did our second lift in another few hours.

This was the first time I had done any light clay, and I know it is another whole natural building method in it’s own right.  We have helped some friends build their house with chip slip, which is the same as light clay but uses wood chips instead.  The mixing of clay and straw has been used as an infill material for timber framed buildings from at least the 12th century in Germany and elsewhere in Europe.

It was really great to so easily utilize a variation of natural building in our predominantly straw bale house.  I think we would have done more in some of the other awkward spaces, but the timing of the summer sun was a bit late for ensuring a complete drying out of the clay slip, and we ended up making lots of small oddly shaped bales to stuff with.  But that will be another post~ the results of baling above this light clay wall and then plastering over the whole thing was quite positive.  The flatness made for a lovely plastering experience, compared to the lumpyness of the bales… but that will be another post as well!  Stay tuned as I catch up on a busy summer and fall of building.

Straw Bale House Building Work Party

NATURAL BUILDING WORK PARTY!  Learning opportunities for straw baling, light clay, and plastering starting now and continuing throughout September for our straw bale addition on Pender Island, BC.

It has been a rather unpredictable summer in terms of our building schedule, but we are finally at the point of putting the straw bales into the walls of our house.  These things just always take longer, right??  We started off on Monday, August 21 with an enthusiastic group, gathering in the morning to check out the partial solar eclipse that was visible from this part of the continent, and then spending the rest of the day getting the order of operations sorted out.

Our method of placing the bales standing up in the columns created by the stud frame is different from what we did for the other half of the house, which was a timber frame structure with the straw bales stacked like bricks and secured with exterior vertical bamboo.

We would like to invite everyone who is interested in experiencing building with straw bales to come for a few hours, or a few days, to take part in a variety of jobs which will shift over the next few weeks as the work progresses.  From this point onwards, there will be many tasks to complete, and while it will be difficult to schedule the type of work being done over this next time period, we would like to offer a general list of natural building components that we will be looking for help with:

  • trimming, notching, sizing, and stacking bales
  • stuffing
  • light clay- we will be filling some areas
  • clay slipping all the wall surfaces
  • mixing and applying the first coat of plaster

light clay- filling the forms

Give us a shout and let us know when you can come and we will try our best to let you know what we will be doing.  Or, let us know what you want to do, and we will contact you when that job will be happening as soon as we know.  Things will be much quicker depending on the amount of help we have, but realistically, we also have to consider the cooling of the days as we get into the plastering part of things.  The plaster needs to dry completely within a certain time frame… same for the light clay.

trimming and notching bales

This week, August 23 – 25, and August 27-31, we will be working to fill the walls and we are looking for extra help.  Anyone that is interested in learning a different way of building with straw bale is welcome!    We also have a lovely pond for swimming and will be providing snacks.  If you are from off island, please send us a note of your interest and we can provide more details.

GROUNDWORK- Building with Straw Bale

Last year we were approached about being interviewed for a short documentary about building with straw bales.  We are excited to share our story as well as our reasons for choosing straw bales and other natural materials to build with, and it is delightful to be among other home owners and builders who share the same sentiments about the homes we create.  We are currently on this journey once again, and the reminder of why we are doing this is truely valuable in the face of the various challenges that manifest during such a large and complex project.

Our wood working shop is also featured in Episode 1-Building with Cob.

Other episodes made are Episode 2- Building with Timber and Episode 4- Building with Rammed Earth.

*Made by TELUS Optik Local~ supports compelling, original stories told by filmmakers from BC and Alberta by providing production funding, training and exposure to new audiences.

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